Relationship Between Low-Energy and High-Energy Wrist Fracturesand BMI in Postmenopausal Women

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Number of pages: 216-219
Year-Number: 2021-Volum: 3, Issue: 3

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Abstract

Although several studies have showed that a high body mass index (BMI) provides protection against wrist fracture, contrasting studies have argued that BMI does not affect the risk of wrist fracture. This study aims to evaluate the relationship between BMI and wrist fracture. In the present study, results of a total of 121 postmenopausal women who had been diagnosed with wrist fracture in our clinic from 2015 to 2020 were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups, low-energy and high-energy wrist fractures, by a single orthopaedist. Age, BMI, bone mineral density (BMD), trauma types and fracture types of the patients were evaluated. A total of 121 patients were included in the study. Mean age of the patients was 72.0±8.6 and mean  BMI was 25.9±7.7. Of all the patients 52.1% had high-energy fractures while %62.0 had fragmented fractures. In the low-energy fracture group, BMI values were statistically significantly lower(24.5±7.9 vs 28.0±6.0). Osteoporosis was statistically significantly higher in the low-energy fracture group (53.4%) compared with the high-energy group (15.9%). It was also revealed that as BMI increased, the risk of fragmented fracture statistically significantly decreased.  The results of the present study showed that BMI was lower in low-energy wrist fractures. In addition, the risk of fragmented fracture increased in the group with lower BMI. 

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