Evaluation of Pain and Anxiety Levels of Tooth Extraction

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Number of pages : 16-21

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Abstract

The anxiety observed in patients before and during dental treatments is defined as a complex behavior pattern related to physiological activation against internal or external stimuli. Anxiety formation is common before dental treatments, especially before tooth extraction. In this study, we were aimed to evaluate the anxiety, preoperative / postoperative pain levels and the relationship of various variables (age, smoking, etc.) with tooth extraction, which is one of the most basic procedures of oral and maxillofacial surgery. During the study process, 982 patients applied, 312 patients were identified according to the inclusion criteria, and the study was conducted with 210 patients who volunteered to participate in the study. There were significant differences between the groups in terms of marital status, educational status, history of previous tooth extraction and tooth brushing frequency (p <0.05). The level of anxiety increases towards posterior teeth (mean: 37.38 ± 7.40 for anterior teeth, mean: 44.40 ± 10.43 for molar teeth with complications). When the VAS scores were examined, the pain increased significantly from the anterior teeth to the posterior teeth (r: 0.568, p <0.05). There were statistically significant differences in terms of Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) total scores when the groups that had tooth extraction were compared. Although smoking causes an increase in the incidence of alveolar osteitis, it has been observed that it causes less pain (low VAS score) in patients who undergo tooth extraction.

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